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Feb 2017
Trish Foundation contributes to first-ever discovery
Jun 2017
Researchers funded by the Trish Foundation making great progress
Dec 2017
Announcement by NHMRC
Jan 2018
2018 Round of Funding Four new Projects announced
Jun 2018
Exciting regrowth of nerve fibres
Jun 2018
Dr Merson secures $1 million from NHMRC
Jun 2018
Findings submitted for publication
Jan 2017
New Research Projects commencing 2017 announced

Incubator Grant Hatches

Further Funds  

In 2010, Dr Fabienne Brilot-Turville and Dr Russell Dale, based at The Children's Hospital, Westmead, received a $26,000 incubator grant from the Trish Multiple Sclerosis Research Foundation to study biomarkers in early paediatric demyelination.

In a short period of time the team of young researchers, with complementary skills in clinical neuroscience and basic science immunology, have made rapid progress in the understanding of paediatric MS.  Their research has already resulted in a remarkable four publications in peer-reviewed scientific journals.  ‘We are grateful for the support of The Trish Multiple Sclerosis Research Foundation’, explained Dr Brilot-Turville.  

Up to 10% of adult MS sufferers have their first episode of demyelination when they are young, and MS is being diagnosed increasingly in children. A protein named MOG (Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein) is thought to be important in the autoimmune response observed in MS. Dr Brilot-Turville and colleagues have recruited the largest Australian group of Children with a first episode of demyelination. ‘With our Incubator grant from the Trish Multiple Sclerosis Research Foundation, we have been able to show that the presence of antibodies against MOG is a sensitive indicator in a subgroup of children with their first episode of demyelination,’ reported Dr Brilot-Turville.  

The researchers have also developed a new test to enable them to identify white blood cells, especially antibody-producing B cells, in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients. This is important, as B cells may be involved in the generation of MOG antibodies in children with first episode of demyelination.   

These exciting developments have enabled Dr Fabienne Brilot-Turville to build on the Trish Multiple Sclerosis Research Foundation funding and gain a three year Research Fellowship from the Star Scientific Foundation to continue her research.

Trish Foundation & MS Research Australia Working together to find a cure for MS
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