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Feb 2017
Trish Foundation contributes to first-ever discovery
Jun 2017
Researchers funded by the Trish Foundation making great progress
Dec 2014
2015 Funding announced
Mar 2015
Investigating new treatment options
Oct 2015
Progress in MS Research Conference
Feb 2016
2016 Round of Funding
Sep 2016
Dr Gu's Incubator Grant announced
Jan 2017
New Research Projects commencing 2017 announced

Enhancing brain activity to
re-wrap nerve fibres  

 

Project Grant - $170,000 over 2017-2019 funded by the Trish Multiple Sclerosis Research Foundation

Investigator:
Dr Kaylene Young, Menzies Institute for Medical Research, Tasmania

Co-Investigators:
Dr Carlie Cullen, Menzies Institute for Medical Research, Tasmania       
Associate Professor Jennifer Rodger, University of Western Australia, WA

Summary

MS results from the loss of myelin, the insulating sheath around nerve fibres, in the brain and spinal cord. Myelin can be repaired, but in the progressive forms of MS, repair is not complete leading to irreversible disability. There are currently no treatment options that are capable of repairing myelin damage for people with progressive MS.

Dr Young and her team have recently established that a non-invasive technique, known as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, is able to massage brain activity and increase the production of cells that produce myelin in the brain. In this project, Dr Young will use this technology as a treatment in two different laboratory models of MS. She will test its ability to increase the production of the myelin producing cells, to re-wrap nerve fibres in myelin and promote lesion repair in the brain. Dr Young will examine brain tissue under the microscope to determine effectiveness of this treatment in mediating successful repair of myelin and in combatting disease progression in the models.

This type of magnetic stimulation is safe for human use and is already being used clinically for the treatment of other nervous system disorders. Therefore, it is hoped that a successful outcome from this project will allow it to be trialled in hospitals for the treatment of people with MS within a short timeframe, providing a much needed therapeutic option for progressive MS.

Trish Foundation & MS Research Australia Working together to find a cure for MS
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