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Feb 2017
Trish Foundation contributes to first-ever discovery
Jun 2017
Researchers funded by the Trish Foundation making great progress
Dec 2017
Announcement by NHMRC
Jan 2018
2018 Round of Funding Four new Projects announced
Oct 2015
Progress in MS Research Conference
Feb 2016
2016 Round of Funding
Sep 2016
Dr Gu's Incubator Grant announced
Jan 2017
New Research Projects commencing 2017 announced

Development of a new drug
to overcome progressive
multiple sclerosis

The Trish Foundation has partnered with MS Research Australia to fully fund some additional research of Dr Steven Petratos from Monash University. Dr Petratos has been awarded a one year Project Grant to test a drug that could stop and potentially reverse progressive MS. Dr Petratos’ Co-investigator is Dr Kaylene Young from the Menzies Institute for Medical Research at the University of Tasmania.

Myelin is the protective coating around nerve fibres in the brain and spinal cord. In MS, the immune system mistakenly attacks the myelin. In progressive MS, there is a gradual increase in disability without periods of remission. This gradual loss of myelin may be the cause of progressive MS.

In previous studies, it was found that the molecule called MCT8 is lacking in some people with MS. This molecule is found in the cells that make myelin, called oligodendrocytes. Without sufficient amounts of MCT8, the oligodendrocytes die and do not produce myelin.

In this project, Dr Petratos and his team will perform some pre-clinical studies to determine if a potential therapeutic is able to stop and potentially reverse the loss of myelin in the brain. This therapy may allow the oligodendrocytes to survive and produce myelin, allowing the body to repair itself. This research may lead to a new therapeutic option for people with progressive MS.

Trish Foundation & MS Research Australia Working together to find a cure for MS
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